A Savage Project and the photographic journey

A Savage Project and the photographic journey

Creative is not a word that I generally use to describe myself. Yet, one of the most interesting parts of photography to me is the subjectivity. I love that the same photograph can leave two people with completely different impressions and it seems that this subjectivity forces me to get more creative. Creativity is an area that I've always struggled with, not because I don't want it, but because it doesn't seem to come to me as freely as I’d like. As someone who spends their day in a technical profession where every problem has a correct solution, it can be a challenge to produce something that isn't tied to a predefined outcome. Thus my photography forces me to explore the world in a different way.

What’s so good about Photography?

What’s so good about Photography?

For as long as I can remember I have had a camera. My grandmother gave me a 110-film camera when I was very young and I was hooked immediately. I could never snap enough pics of my family and cats and friends.

I often went on weekend kids camps with my church and my mum would buy me a 12 exposure roll of film for the occasion. I loved the anticipation as I waited for her to take them to the chemist for processing, the excitement when she finally collected them, the disappointment when half of them were underexposed or blurry or covered by a finger - and finally the satisfaction when I managed to get a good one.

But why so much emotion over a picture? Why does taking photos still get me excited all these years later? I think it’s a combination of a few things – sometimes familiarity, sometimes the need to document the details and mostly the chase to capture what I like to call the ‘money shot’.

How everyday photography has changed

How everyday photography has changed

Photography is very different from how it was 20 years ago. In an age where photography is free, accessible and unlimited, there is a looming problem - the sheer volume of our personal collections are overwhelming. In a life where photography is endless, where is the meaning amongst the digital junk?